About Carolyn Wilhelm

Carolyn Wilhelm is the author and sole owner of Books and Jams site and blog. She has a BS in Elementary Education, an MS in Gifted Education, an MA in Curriculum and Instruction K-12, and has completed the KHT Montessori 12 month program. She makes mostly free resources for teachers and parents. Her children's books are available on Amazon. She was a public school teacher for 28 years. She writes for The New Book Review and Sharing with Writers and Readers.
  • Howls-Moving-Castle-student-work-pages-novel-unit

Howl’s Moving Castle Student Work Pages PDF

Howls-Moving-Castle-Diana-Wynne

Howl’s Moving Castle by Diana Wynne Jones is a good antidote for children too hooked on other magic books. The book has been made into a movie that students may have seen. For students who might be wishing to attend a magic school and have magic powers, I think this book can help bring them down to earth as most of the magic things go wrong, not much goes right. Like a bad dream, the protagonist, Sophie, becomes old when the Witch of the Waste comes along and curses her. Sophie lives a life of overwork and not much joy for most of the book. This is book one in a trilogy and seems to be the most popular of the three novels.

The castle is magic and has only one window and four doors. The four doors open to different places. The castle can change locations and shapes. The people in the town are scared of the building. They are scared of Howl. The Witch of the Waste scares everyone. Howl is not at all like the typical magician. While he is vain and selfish most of the time, he does dote on his nephews when he makes them what we would call video games years before they are even invented.

When both of the parents leave for different reasons, Sophie is left with the drudgery of a hat shop.  Her sisters become apprentices elsewhere. When Sophie becomes suddenly old, she leaves not really knowing where to go. She walks and walks, and ends up living in Howl’s Castle. Howl isn’t especially nice to her but also lets her stay. Her companions are a fire (Calcifer) and Michael, Howl’s Apprentice. Right, I didn’t say this book made very much sense. It does have an interesting story as far as the three girls are concerned, whose fates do not turn out too badly.

I already wrote a post about this book on The New Book Review, and at that post is a book and movie discussion guide freebie. The post is Howl’s Moving Castle Book and Movie Discussion Questions.

Howls-moving-castle-book-and-film-discussion-questions
The next link is to the preview of the pack, and it opens here so you can see what is included.

preview-Howls-Moving-Castle-pack
For the page below, students match characters and information to show comprehension of the text.

Howls-Moving-Castle-Work-Pages_Page_05

For the next page, students use creative writing to see the book from the perspective of a journalist. “Lettie and Martha: Are they who they say they are?” This is a good question indeed, because no — they are not for part of the story. Those two sisters trade places using a spell to make them look like each other for part of the time. No one wants to trade places with poor Sophie.

Character traits are important in any story, and these characters have interesting traits. Students will decide which traits belong to the different characters. 
Howls-Moving-Castle-Work-Pages_Page_07

There are some pages for creative writing such as this one, “fortune-telling hats.”

Howls-Moving-Castle-Work-Pages_Page_11

This packet has four read-and-respond work pages for students to demonstrate knowledge of the reading material. The pages include matching, circle the answer, and writing to finish the cause and effect work page. Answer keys are provided for the teacher.

Creative writing pages to accompany the story are included for students to paraphrase or apprentice themselves to the writing in the book for clever answers.

Discussion question pages for the book and the movie are included. Each page has 10 questions each. Students should consult the text as necessary to support their ideas.

Worksheets

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RF.4.4.A

Page 5 Mysterious Matching

Page 6 Significant Settings

Page 7 Character Traits

Page 8 Cause and Effect

Creative Writing

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.2

CSS.ELA-LITERACY.L.4.3.A

Page 9 Name the Jars

Page 10 The Four Doors

Page 11 Fortune Telling Hats

Page 12 Invention Imagination Reflection

Page 13 Ingary Gazette Newspaper

Discussion Questions

CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.4.4

Page 14 Book Discussion Questions

Page 15 Movie Discussion Questions

Rubrics for Teacher and Student

Pages 16-and 17

Answer Keys for Worksheets

Pages 18-21

Thank you for reading! Carolyn

Howls-Moving-Castle-student-work-pages-novel-unit

  • Alex-asks-grandpa-about-the-olden-days

Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story

Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story

Written by Gary L. Wilhelm, Edited by Carolyn Wilhelm, Illustrator Pieter Els

In this story, a young child is wondering about the “olden days” when his grandpa was young like him. His mother takes the child to Grandpa’s house so he can ask some questions about life long ago. Grandpa had lived in a small house with a metal roof in South Dakota. Coal was burned to provide heat in the winter. In those days, there was no air conditioning, and people opened windows instead. The backyard had a vegetable garden. Three generations lived in the house.

Lexile Level 700L

Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story

The wooden party-line phone on the wall had no apps. There was no television, but radio shows told stories such as the Lone Ranger. Books such as the Hardy Boys and Nancy Drew Mysteries were popular.

Grandpa’s other grandparents lived on a farm and would sometimes burn corncobs. The farm had animals such as workhorses who were named Tom and Jerry. Chicks could be ordered through the mail, and the post office was full of chirping when they arrived each spring. Harvest time was special with the use of a threshing machine.

Around the neighborhood, kids would pass the blacksmith on their bikes. Sometimes the blacksmith helped fix bicycles for the children.

Financial times were still difficult after World War Two. One of the stories involves a skunk that became dinner for someone Grandpa’s father did some work for and tried to collect payment. Needless to say, no money changed hands that day.

Grandpa’s mother taught in a one-room schoolhouse. His father had a construction company. Fishing was a popular pastime.

We hope you will enjoy this story from the 1940s.

Gary’s first book was Good Afternoon Vietnam: A Civilian in the Vietnam War.

Here is a letter-writing freebie to accompany the Grandpa book.

write-letters-writing-frames-freebie-K-2-

You might also like these posts:

Then and Now Sorting Cards Freebie

then-and-now-comparing-cards-free-printable

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

 
individual-word-wall-friendly-letter-writing-freebie
 

The letter writing PDF includes a word wall with family and words for writing letters.

 
 
individual-word-wall-friendly-letter-writing-freebie
 

The letter writing PDF includes different writing frames to accommodate K-2 students.

 
 
a-c-writing-word-wall-sample-page
 

Sample page of the individual family and letter-writing word wall which may be added to a writing binder.

 
sample-of-one-letter-writing-frame
 

Sample of a letter-writing frame page. Different line heights are included to accommodate students in K-2.

 
Adoption Matters: Orphan Train to Modern Day Nonfiction Short Stories of Adoption & Foster Care
 

Adoption Matters: Orphan Train to Modern Day Nonfiction Short Stories of Adoption & Foster Care

Beginning with a story about a mother who had been adopted from the Orphan Train and continuing on through the years, this anthology is a collection of stories, poems, and letters about the experiences of fifteen authors. Read the blog post here. See also the book on Amazon.

 
Alex Asks About Auntie’s Airplane Day: An Adoption Day Story
 

Alex Asks About Auntie’s Airplane Day: An Adoption Day Story

Alex Asks About Auntie’s Airplane Day: An Adoption Day Story is an easy reader picture book to help young children learn about multi-race family adoptions. Carolyn and her husband adopted a girl from South Korea many years ago.

 
A Mom: What is an Adoptive Mother? Children’s Book
 

A Mom: What is an Adoptive Mother? Children’s Book – What is a mother? A mother is the same whether children are adopted or biological. In this story, the child has been adopted. It is written from the viewpoint of the child.

 
Math Measuring Story with Fraction Work Pages Free
 

Math Measuring Story with Fraction Work Pages Free – This is a math measuring story and also has fractions posters, activities, and work pages with answer keys. Find the free printable instant download in our free level members page.

 
Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE for Middle Grades
 

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE for Middle Grades – Download the free student pack at this link. 

 
Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story
 

Alex Asks Grandpa About the Olden Days: A 1940s Story

In this story, a young child is wondering about the “olden days” when his grandpa was young like him. His mother takes the child to Grandpa’s house so he can ask some questions about life long ago.

 

  • famous-climate-change-artists-and-others-art-informational-post

World’s Most Famous Climate Change Artist and Others

World’s Most Famous Climate Change Artist? According to The Economist’s September 9-21-2019 climate change issue, the answer is Olafur Eliasson. He began his career at age 15 in Iceland. He is now over 50 years old. He has been producing art in this area for at least 35 years. Climate change is not new. Climate change art is not new. Really, we have known about global warming and have understood the solutions for decades. In the 1970’s it was brought to the forefront of the nation with the oil crisis at that time. I had hoped people would begin driving more compact cars, but the cars only became larger, and larger — SUV’s. Station wagons, a thing of the past, now seem small.

Olafur Eliasson created the Rainbow Panorama (pictured below). He began his career selling gouaches (a type of painting) of landscapes from his walks with his father, an Icelandic painter. He photographed shrinking glaciers and polluted rivers. He became famous for his sensory experience art shows such as the “Weather Project.” He had 14 massive chunks of ice moved from Greenland to the Thames for the Paris Accord to demonstrate global warming.

Rainbow Panorama image by Olafur Eliassan

Artists producing works in the area of climate change are growing.  “The Edible Hut” in Detroit, Michigan, was created by Mira Burack (Matterology). Renzo Martens works in the Congo and draws attention to the palm-oil industry’s impact on the environment. Vivien Sansout collaborates with farmers in Honduras and other areas.

“Cooking Sections” serves food for their performances in unlikely, polluted areas around the world. For the brave! Instead of carnivores or herbivores, they suggest people become “climavores” and eating locally sourced food.

There are art shows, sculptures, and a wide variety of artistic representations of climate change. There are professional and homemade signs at protests. The Politicians Discussing Climate Change sculpture in Berlin is one vivid example.

Recently we were inWorld’s Most Famous Climate Change Artist. David Attenborough’s image is on a building there.

https://www.bbc.com/news/av/uk-47972979/sir-david-attenborough-presents-climate-change-the-facts

The global warming art show by Neil Grabowsky is an example of a gallery display.

640px-0010-Climate_Art_Reception-Neil_Grabowsky-NEG_7023_(34505630406)

Emerging artists are also finding this topic important to document. The next image is “Passing Winds” and is the first such work of this person.

26476829875_1b300ddd0d_w

Even Pixabay.com has climate change pictures. There are many resources and articles online about climate change. Art is part of it all.
climate-change-2063240

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

 

You might also like

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE: Students Help Save the Earth (Climate Captives)

In this futuristic book about how the world has changed due to global warming, students create projects to help save the earth. Living towers house those willing to stay inside community walls and resisters live in the nearby forest. The years 2019, 2027, 2028, and 2030 are especially important in this Cli-Fi middle-grade story. The dystopian ending is only for a few people who contributed to and thought they were escaping the end of life on Earth. Characters develop their own projects after researching and choosing their topics, and communicate by secret code when necessary. Endnotes provide documentation and online links for facts.

Download the free student pack at the link below:

climate-change-captives-2035-novel-student-pages

and the Jamboard file at this link

Winner of the LiFE Award for environmental books. 

Sue Ready of the Ever Ready blog reviewed the blog at the next link:

https://sockfairies.blogspot.com

Climate Change Captives 2035 on Amazon
 

You might also like

Climate change informational text for Earth and other days with answer keys on Teachers Pay Teachers

climate-change-info-text-earth-day-Easel-activity-and-assessment

  • discussion-questions-for-articles-in-the-economist-9-21-2019-climate-change-issue-free-instant-download

The Economist Climate Change Issue Discussion Questions

Recently, I wrote a blog post about The Economist’s Climate Change Issue (9-21-2019). I can’t stop thinking about the articles and thought I could prepare a discussion guide for secondary teachers who might find the magazine in the school or local library. So, I did. I wrote questions for many but not all of the articles, thinking about what might be discussed in class.

Click on the link below to download your free instant PDF with the five pages of questions.

the-economist-discussion-questions-sept-2019-issue

Really, reading any of the articles might be enough to inform some people. They have really researched the information and presented it well.

 
Discussion questions for Economist Magazine Climate Change Issue Page One
 

Page one of the PDF begins with the first article in the magazine regarding global warming, A Warming World: The Climate Issue provides background information. The questions on page one also include Briefing, Climate Change, What Goes Up. Is is easy to notice they do not say “goes down.” Many of their titles are particularly clever in this issue. Scientists discovered gases in our atmosphere decades ago. But like many scientific discoveries, the information was not widely accepted.

This page also asks questions about the Green New Deals article.

 
Discussion questions for Economist Magazine Climate Change Issue Page Two
 

Page two of the PDF discusses drought and the Panama Canal. A first thought might be that the Panama Canal probably has lots of water, and the sea level is rising, so what’s the problem? This article offers discussion of both drought and sea rise. It has alarming information of what could happen to the Caribbean Islands of San Blas if sea levels continue to rise. But how is there both drought and flooding? That is the question for students to consider.

Mexico’s identity rests on oil. One point in that article is that being an environmentalist is a luxury few can afford.

The page also has questions about the Asia article and how some areas are already planning for rising seas.

 
Discussion questions for Economist Magazine Climate Change Issue Page Three
 

Asian countries are among the top 12 for carbon emissions. They are also some of the most vulnerable. People will say China and India aren’t doing anything, but they are as mentioned in the article — just probably not enough.

The Europe section begins with Russia and how some people there are looking forward to rising temperatures. Student could read and find out why that might be true.

Germany is trying to end all dependence on coal, but this effort is meeting some difficulties. Why would it be a problem?

 
 
Discussion questions for Economist Magazine Climate Change Issue Page Four

The first question on page four is about how locals have renamed the olive groves, gives information about spittlebugs, and explains why climate change isn’t the culprit — directly.

Britain is trying to market offshore wind turbines, but they are not as wonderful as they might sound. The article describes the problems and how people are ever hopeful and working on this solution anyway.

The small island nations are in great difficulty as TIME Magazine’s climate change issue mentioned. (My blog post about that magazine also has a free PDF for teachers.) The islands are working together and getting the attention of larger countries.

Business has some climate capitalists who would like to do well for the planet and themselves as well. How there could be climate lawsuits in the future is also discussed.

 
Discussion questions for Economist Magazine Climate Change Issue Page Five
 
 

The first question on page 5 of the discussion hand-out asks about the biggest source of uncertainty in predicting how climate change will evolve. Why scientists are having difficulty is described in the Science and Technology section of the magazine.

Books and Arts provides the names of climate change artists and describes some performance art by “Cooking Sections.” It is very interesting. Climate change art is a thing.

The end of this issue of The Economist is an obituary for an 800-year-old glacier. It wasn’t the most remote. It wasn’t the smallest. The article does make one pause and think.

Thank you for reading,
Carolyn

You may also be interested in the following posts.

 

You might also like

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE: Students Help Save the Earth (Climate Captives)

In this futuristic book about how the world has changed due to global warming, students create projects to help save the earth. Living towers house those willing to stay inside community walls and resisters live in the nearby forest. The years 2019, 2027, 2028, and 2030 are especially important in this Cli-Fi middle-grade story. The dystopian ending is only for a few people who contributed to and thought they were escaping the end of life on Earth. Characters develop their own projects after researching and choosing their topics, and communicate by secret code when necessary. Endnotes provide documentation and online links for facts.

Download the free student pack at the link below:

climate-change-captives-2035-novel-student-pages

and the Jamboard file at this link

Winner of the LiFE Award for environmental books. 

Sue Ready of the Ever Ready blog reviewed the blog at the next link:

https://sockfairies.blogspot.com

Climate Change Captives 2035 on Amazon
 

You might also like

Climate change informational text for Earth and other days with answer keys on Teachers Pay Teachers

climate-change-info-text-earth-day-Easel-activity-and-assessment

  • review-of-the-economist-9-21-2019-climate-change

Review of The Economist Climate Issue 9-21-2019

A Warming World: The climate issue

The 9-21-2019 Economist magazine has many articles about climate change. They say their special issue is not all about the carbon-based climate crisis. The June 2019 Time magazine climate change issue had only one article. There is a free work page for students and answer key for teachers at this link for the Time magazine article. I wanted more information and consulted The Economist. Unlike the one-time article, however, except for short exerpts, the infomation is not free online. Libraries probably subscribe to the magazine, though

Near the beginning paragraph of the first article, it says:

“From one year to the next, you cannot feel the difference.”

For elementary students, I would say that from similar seasons they have experienced in their short lives, they might not feel much difference. Summer is summer, winter is winter, and so on to children. In summer, we swim and have picnics. In winter, we skate and go sliding. On some days, there might be an indoor recess due to rain or snow. The weather might seem different to them, while they are (like us) unaware of global warming. The cover of the September 21st 2019 edition of The Economist shows stripes on the cover, revealing temperatures have risen one degree Celsius.

What is the big deal about a one-degree rise in temperatures? This link is to an infographic “Earth Temperature Timeline,” that shows in cartoon form why a degree is a big deal. They mean Celsius when they talk about the rise in temperature, not Fahrenheit. For every 1-degree change in Celsius, there is a 1.8-degree change in Fahrenheit. The degree rise information would be a good topic for math class.

climate-change-will-hurt-people-not-the-planet-Economist-9-21-2019

Article one in The Economist’s climate issue is about how the changing climate touches everything. They say the issue “must be tackled urgently and clear-headedly.” They state the foundations of the world economy and geopolitics are carbon-based. It is not simple to solve the issues. They think this does not mean “shackling capitalism.” They say climate (alone) is never the entire story. This is why the topic of climate change is so controversial.

Other Background Information to Know

Before I continue the review of the articles, I want to share some information to help put this issue in context, in addition to the Earth Temperature Timeline (link above). The next image is from my free climate change PowerPoint for grades 3-6. Often people think climate change is inevitable due to our position third from the sun. The atmosphere of Venus is 96% carbon dioxide and has a temperature of 467 °C or 872 °F. Yet Mercury is closest to the sun and has an average temperature of 332 °C or 167 °F, and has a very thin atmosphere. Venus should be a lesson to us as we trap more and more carbon dioxide within our own atmosphere.

climate-change-not-due-to-earth-being-third-from-the-sun

Back to The Economist Climate Issue

We know what to do about climate change, but the difficulties in implementing solutions are complex. The article suggests using pricing on carbon could help innovations not yet imagined. Necessity is the mother of invention, after all. Although some countries have made improvements, it is difficult to know which countries are doing what when emissions in the world-wide atmosphere are considered. Twelve economies cause the most emissions. Capitalism and economic freedom must include global warming solutions.

The-Economist-9-21-2019-says-we-already-know-what-to-do-about-global-warming

The following section is Briefing Climate Change. The first part is “What goes up.” The article explains the gasses in the atmosphere and people who discovered them decades ago, such as Joseph Fourier (French), John Tyndall (Irish), and Svante Arrhenius (Swedish). None foresaw that our emissions would be nearly 20 times as much as in 1900. The article explains why it has increased so much. Before 1950, scientists thought carbon dioxide would be absorbed in the oceans, which Roger Revelle disproved.

“In 1965 the carbon-dioxide level was 320 parts per million (ppm). The carbon-dioxide level is now 408 ppm, and still rising by 2ppm a year.”

Their ice-age chart helps us understand the changes. The chart subject line says it is “like an ice age in reverse.” The scientific information is complex, in-depth, and provided in the magazine. 90% of the warming is in our oceans, but that is not solving the problem; it is warming the earth. A different source online explains that land icebergs reflect sunlight, but when land icebergs melt, the water is blue and doesn’t reflect, which means it absorbs heat from the sun.

every-decade-since-the-1970s-has-been-warmer-than-the-one-before-according-to-The-Economist-9-21-2019

The United Nations signed the 1972 UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). Since then, there are been more emissions. The IPCC (Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change) reports there has already been a warming of more than 3 °C in the Arctic. The Paris agreement said the rise should be under 2 °C, so that is important to know. Maps and charts help students understand the dense text in the article. There is no certain temperature change that means anything catastrophic will happen to earth, but just as water boils at 212 °F, we are seeing certain heating at this time. The longer we wait, the harder it will be to make the necessary adaptations.

The obstacle course (Green New Deals) article evaluates whether big plans to deal with climate change can make a difference. America stands out as being the largest contributor to global warming and is reluctant to address the problems. The article says Americans who believe in climate change outnumber those who do not five to one. It has become a presidential election campaign issue. The many efforts to help the climate in the USA are described. The stances of the Democratic candidates are also described. The rhetoric of some Republicans has begun to change a little. Virginia coal miners are being retrained as beekeepers, which will help the environment, but larger nationwide programs are needed. More about other countries, The Panama Canal, and Bolivia are included in The Americas section.

Planning for rising sea levels: In Deep Trouble is the Asia article in this issue. The dramatic picture shows a family in North Jakarta, waist-deep in water carrying some of their belongings and trying to get to safety. Thirteen of the twenty cities predicted to have the most significant increases in annual losses caused by flooding are in Asia. According to Andreas, a geologist, the sea is rising, and the cities are sinking in parts of northern coastal Jakarta. Forty percent of Jakarta is now below sea level. Extensive amounts of money have been spent in Singapore. Systems were built, and as explained in the article, problems persist.

Fires in the Amazon are not the only ones smoldering on Earth. Indonesia, Sumatra, and Borneo have had fires. They need rain. The difficulties of stopping the fires from economic to location near peat bogs, weather, and unpaid fines are described. Peat fires burn underground much longer than above ground.

The Asia section says China has upheld pledges about greenhouse-gas emissions, but more must be done. It says power firms there proposed 500 new coal-fired power stations that, if built, will damn the planet. The article is very thorough.

Oil markets and the Middle East and Africa situations are also covered. How climate change makes it harder to reduce poverty in one of the world’s poorest states, Malawi, is explained.

The Europe section begins with “a warmer Russia” which some in Siberia are not against. New shorter shipping routes are opening up, and Russia is spending money on developing the routes. However, calamities due to increased warmth are also happening. Unstable weather problems are happening. However, most Russians are not very concerned with the temperature rise. Germany is reducing reliance on coal with some controversy. Southern Europe is seeing climate change destroy ancient olive groves. Again, the explanation is provided. Lessons from the largest offshore wind market in Britain are featured. Britain’s success is helping other countries who benefit from their experiences.

The International section explains the plight of small islands. I wrote about this in the Time magazine climate change article which is free and online for students and teachers. However, The Economist has an excellent article on this problem. The Business section is about climate change capitalists. The Science and technology section is also about climate change. As the beginning article states, climate change touches everything the magazine reports on.

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

The video below is motivational and is not about climate change. However, an analogy may be made to climate change as it is about degrees of heat, although we do not need to turn up the heat on Earth. We don’t know the degree at which problems on earth will be insurmountable. One degree makes a big difference.

 

You might also like

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE: Students Help Save the Earth (Climate Captives)

In this futuristic book about how the world has changed due to global warming, students create projects to help save the earth. Living towers house those willing to stay inside community walls and resisters live in the nearby forest. The years 2019, 2027, 2028, and 2030 are especially important in this Cli-Fi middle-grade story. The dystopian ending is only for a few people who contributed to and thought they were escaping the end of life on Earth. Characters develop their own projects after researching and choosing their topics, and communicate by secret code when necessary. Endnotes provide documentation and online links for facts.

Download the free student pack at the link below:

climate-change-captives-2035-novel-student-pages

and the Jamboard file at this link

Winner of the LiFE Award for environmental books. 

Sue Ready of the Ever Ready blog reviewed the blog at the next link:

https://sockfairies.blogspot.com

Climate Change Captives 2035 on Amazon
 

You might also like

Climate change informational text for Earth and other days with answer keys on Teachers Pay Teachers

climate-change-info-text-earth-day-Easel-activity-and-assessment

  • Climate-Change-Captives-2035-and-Project-SAVE-student-work-pages-book-companion-free-PDF

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE for Middle Grades

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE for Middle Grades

 

You might also like

Climate Change Captives 2035 and Project SAVE: Students Help Save the Earth (Climate Captives)

In this futuristic book about how the world has changed due to global warming, students create projects to help save the earth. Living towers house those willing to stay inside community walls and resisters live in the nearby forest. The years 2019, 2027, 2028, and 2030 are especially important in this Cli-Fi middle-grade story. The dystopian ending is only for a few people who contributed to and thought they were escaping the end of life on Earth. Characters develop their own projects after researching and choosing their topics, and communicate by secret code when necessary. Endnotes provide documentation and online links for facts.

Download the free student pack at the link below:

climate-change-captives-2035-novel-student-pages

and the Jamboard file at this link

Winner of the LiFE Award for environmental books. 

Sue Ready of the Ever Ready blog reviewed the blog at the next link:

https://sockfairies.blogspot.com

Climate Change Captives 2035 on Amazon
 

You might also like

Climate change informational text for Earth and other days with answer keys on Teachers Pay Teachers

climate-change-info-text-earth-day-Easel-activity-and-assessment

2020-08-23T13:03:03-05:00By |Categories: Book Review, Climate Change, Free, Grades 3-6|Tags: |

TIME Magazine Climate Change Issue 6-24-19 Review

The June 24th, 2019 issue of TIME magazine was devoted to climate change. The article begins with a story about how complicated and out of the way it is to travel to Vunidogoloa, Fiji. The last leg of the trip follows a guide with a machete to arrive at the village. It was abandoned five years ago. Saltwater has encroached upon the environment. I noticed the magazine after attending a Climate Reality Leadership Corps training in Minneapolis, MN, in August of 2019.

The village administrator of Vunidogoloa says, “the rights of the living have been lost because of climate change.

The full article is available online at the next link. Teachers who want to use my free instant download PDF work page may direct students to the TIME link to read the article.

https://time.com/longform/sinking-islands-climate-change/

Click on the next link for your free instant download PDF.

TIME-June-24-2019-discussion-questions-freebie-PDF

The free instant download PDF work page is a single page for students, with one corresponding answer page for teachers. This is an image of the student page:

TIME-June-24-2019-discussion-questions-freebie-PDF_Page_1This work is intended for students in upper grades and secondary school as the reading material has dense text. The United Nations, Fiji, the Marshall Islands, and words like Prime Minister would be helpful vocabulary for students to understand the article. An entire village had to be abandoned and moved to higher ground in Fiji. There are plans to move 40 more villages in the coming years. Wherever we live, this is important for us to understand. The implications are clear. Goals are for temperatures to rise no more than 2 degrees Celsius by the end of the century. However, temperatures will rise 3 degrees Celsius if countries only adhere to their current plans. More has to be done, of course. Students who are concerned about climate change will be interested in this TIME magazine.

Time-June-24-2019-village-abandoned-due-to-climate-change
Online articles are wonderful for schools as (after buying computers) there is free access to such resources. They are good for teacher information, as well.

A delegation who viewed the destruction in Fiji was brought to tears. The Secretary-General of the United Nations, Guterres, is requiring nations to make commitments to reduce emissions. The U.N. is working on several efforts in this area.

Thank you for reading.

Carolyn

  • Clare-O-Beara-author-interview-Dublin-Ireland-and-IT-support-webmaster-Allen-Tennent

Clare O’Beara Author Interview in Dublin, Ireland

Clare O’Beara is a prolific, award-winning author who also happens to be a tree surgeon, national Irish show jumping champion, book reviewer for Fresh Fiction, previous MENSA leader and volunteer, and advocate for gifted education, among other talents and abilities. Her fourteen books are in several genres, including science fiction, mystery, romance, and young adult (YA). She contributed to two anthologies, including Dreamless Roads. She won first place for Arkady Renko, a 2014 short story contest judged by Martin Cruz Smith and Sponsored by Simon & Schuster.

Clare-O-Beara-author-interview-Dublin-Ireland-and-IT-support-webmaster-Allen-TennentI happened upon the author’s books, beginning with one in her science fiction set of four books in a series. Hooked, I had to stop everything and read them all. I later found the rest of her books. I liked the Dining Out Around the Solar System series as much as the Wool series by Hugh Howey, Hunger Games by Suzanne Collins, and The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo books by Steig Larsson. All of these series were stop everything, drop, and read as we say in elementary school (DEAR) for silent reading time in class. I was so happy to find another such series. I’m now working my way through the murder mystery series, although I probably should have checked to notice the order of the books first. If she is the author, I click buy.

Most of the books by Clare O’Beara are autobiographical fiction to some degree as she writes what she knows: car engines, tree health, cats, detectives (I am assuming), MENSA, gifted education, and even climate change. I like learning facts when I read, and multi-genre fiction/nonfiction appeals to me. I finish her books “smarter” about a few topics.

As we were in Dublin recently, I met with Clare and her husband, Allen Tennent. When I asked how long she had been writing, she said she had been writing forever. She said she realized self-publishing worked well when she saw an increasing amount of such books on Fresh Fiction (based in Texas). She uploaded the first five books to Amazon all at once in 2014. To me, that was quite an excellent start to have that many books. She bought ten ISBNs immediately and used seven in the first year. With her own YouTube channel, she shares book trailers and other information in videos she creates.

Allen is her IT person. He designs the covers, creates the website, prints the publicity materials, and is the to-go person for technical support. This helps Clare focus on her writing and book reviews.

Molly-Malone-statue-Dublin-IrelandWe saw the statue of Molly Malone that appears on the cover of Murder at the Irish Mensa and snapped this photo. I didn’t even realize there was such a statue until I saw it on the book’s cover before our trip. It was more interesting having just finished reading Murder at the Dublin Mensa as we landed there.

O’Beara is a lifelong learner. She has multiple interests and is a multimedia journalism student. She has learned WordPress, how to make videos on her YouTube channel, how to self-publish, how to prepare her marketing materials, how to enter and win writing awards, take care of cats, organize MENSA events, and be an active tree surgeon. (She informed me a tree surgeon in America would be called an arborist.) Such a person is mindful to me of the multi-potentiality of gifted education students. A real-life example of a person with multiple potentials!

She makes her own video book trailers, such as this one for Dining Out Around the Solar System. Take two minutes to watch the video and see why the book is so interesting. Although science fiction books are set in the future, the problems of society are mirrored in the future lives of people. Racism, college grads with huge debts and low-paying jobs, struggles of young people as they climb the work ladder, oppressive corporations, the competitive work environment, and climate change are all threads woven through this series. O’Beara said she is happy if people read them as allegory or narrative fiction. Reading happens in the reader’s mind, not only from the text. I previously reviewed these books on The New Book Review site.

Dining Out Around the Solar System (Book 1)

Dining Out with the Gas Giants (Book 2)

Dining Out with the Gas Giants (Book 3)

Dining Out on Planet Mercury (Book 4)

Murder at Irish Mensa coverI also have reviewed other books by O’Beara on Amazon, such as this one for Murder at the Dublin Mensa.

Being interested in climate change, she recommends the movie Mimicking Africa for those interested in sustainable animal agriculture. She spoke fondly of the Fota Wildlife Sanctuary in Ireland, where some of the giraffes and zebras spend half the year there and then rotate with places in the zoo. Those animals do not have to live in a zoo all year. Fota is known as a successful cheetah breeding center. She mentioned a book, Mules, as being highly informative.

I was lucky to catch her when her schedule allowed as she has just helped as the official film recorder for the Science Fiction World Con (notice her t-shirt) and was their Hugo Awards problem-solver. She is back in journalism school soon, and the tree season is still busy. Whew! It was wonderful to meet her in person.

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

 
Clare O’Beara Author Interview in Dublin, Ireland
 

Clare O’Beara Author Interview

Clare O’Beara is a prolific, award-winning author who also happens to be a tree surgeon, national showjumping champion, book reviewer for Fresh Fiction, previous MENSA leader and volunteer, and advocate for gifted education among other talents and abilities.

 
 
Rodeo Finn blog post and free student book companion
 

Rodeo Finn by Clare O’Beara Free Student Work Pages

Rodeo Finn by Clare O’Beara is a multi-genre novel for teens and young adults. Realistic equine fiction with nonfiction information regarding Ireland’s and Arizona’s farming, ranching, and equestrian competitions form the story. The free book companion PDF for the book.

 
 
Show Jumping Team novel by Clare O'Beara review and student book companion freebie
 

Show Jumping Team by O’Beara Book Companion Free

Show Jumping Team was written by a National Show Jumping Champion of Ireland, Clare O’Beara. The book is multi-genre as it is realistic fiction with nonfiction information about horses and horse shows. Free teaching supplement at this link.

 
 
A Pony for Quarantine by O’Beara for Read Around the World
 

A Pony for Quarantine by O’Beara

A Pony for Quarantine by Clare O’Beara is so much more than a “horse” book as by way of the pony theme it shares many life lessons for teens. A free teaching supplement is at this link.

 
 
A Dog for Lockdown Book Teaching Supplement Free
 

A Dog for Lockdown by O’Beara

Second in the lockdown series by Clare O’Beara, A Dog For Lockdown is a story about a thirteen-year-old boy who lives with his mother. The free teaching supplement is at this link.

 
 
Dining-Out-Around-Solar-System
 

Dining Out Around the Solar System by Clare O’Beara (Book 1 of 4)

In a future where giant corporations run countries, all British Space Mines has to fear are journalists and hackers.
Donal and Myron are their worst nightmare. See Wise Owl Factory’s review on The New Book Review.

 
 
Dining Out With The Ice Giants (Dining Out Around The Solar System Book 2)
 

Dining Out With The Ice Giants (Dining Out Around The Solar System Book 2) Clare O’Beara

Two journalists in an alternate future London meet the people from the outer planets – during one of the worst winters for cold and flooding that London has suffered. From political misdeeds to mushroom picking in a disused Tube station, Donal and Myron uncover all sorts of activities… and dangers. See what Wise Owl Factory’s thinks about this book on The New Book Review.

 
 
Dining-Out-Series-book-3-by-Clare-O-Beara
 

Dining Out With The Gas Giants (Dining Out Around The Solar System Book 3) by Clare O’Beara

Donal and Myron are journalists who’ll go anywhere for a story. This summer, as tempers flare and riots are sparked in London’s heat, they get a lead they can’t resist. Not all the off-world immigrants are friendly. See Wise Owl Factory’s review on The New Book Review.

 
 
Dining-Out-on-Planet-Mercury
 

Dining Out on Planet Mercury by Clare O’Beara

When a girl from Mercury is suspected of murder, the police need Irish journalist and hacker Donal as interpreter.
Off-world workers are being exploited in more ways than one. See Wise Owl Factory’s review on The New Book Review.

 
 
A-Pony-for-Quarantine-by-Clare-O-Beara-ages-10-14
 

A Pony for Quarantine by Clare O’Beara

Quarantine! Moya, age 13, is sent home from school. She isn’t sure what is happening. Her parents and brother are home, too.  She can hear neighbors cleaning to be prepared in the event they will be sick. Her own parents leave to shop for food, and although they might not get everything they want, will be able to get food. The store is only allowing 100 people inside at a time.

 

  • climate-change-grades-3-6-pptx-and-PDF-free

Climate Change for Grades 3-6 Free PowerPoint

Climate change information for grades 3-6 free PowerPoint and PDF version of the presentation for teachers and homeschools. The instant downloads are at the next links. Click to download your copies.

Climate-Change-Grades-3-6-information free instant download PPTX

Climate-Change-Grades-3-6-information free instant download PPTX

And/or

Climate-Change-Grades-3-6-information PDF

This picture is of Castleview Academy watching and learning from the presentation. homeschool-children-learning-about-climate-change

I recently posted about being trained by the Climate Reality program during August of 2019, provided a free K-3 climate change PDF Presentation, and interviewed someone about their pollinator-friendly lawn. I’ve noticed a lack of climate change materials for elementary grade levels, and today am adding a presentation for grades 3-6. I hope this will help some teachers at school or homeschool begin to discuss the topic with their students.

have-your-heard-about-climate-change
 

Begin by asking the students if they have heard about climate change. What have they heard? Are they aware of disagreements about this topic? 

have-your-heard-about-climate-change
 

Do students know about sources of global warming? Have they seen factories, pollution, garbage dumps, and other possible causes of the problem? 

the-ozone-layer-is-thin
 

The ozone layer is at the top of about ten miles high of atmosphere. The ozone layer has become thinner and has allowed more heat from the sun to be trapped beneath it, which is adding to global warming. 

fast-falling-rain-is-not-absorbed-in-the-ground
 

Have the students seen flash flooding? Do they know what causes this problem? Rain that falls too fast is not absorbed in the ground, so the result may be a flash flood.

everyone can help save the Earth

Climate change has certainly been in the news on an almost daily basis this summer. Record heat waves, record amounts of icebergs melting, record storms, and increased fires have been news topics. The students will be aware of some of this information. The presentation has a few suggestions of what they might consider doing to help the Earth — not just on Earth Day.

No wars are fought over sunshine which makes solar power. No wars are fought over wind power. Wars are fought over fossil fuels. Discuss the fact that one hour of sunshine provides enough energy for the power needs of the earth for an entire year. Have the students discuss their ideas to help reduce global warming.

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

the sun provides all the energy the earth needs for a year every hour
 

You might also like the following resources.

 

  • what-causes-rain-bombs-and-flooding-free-PowerPoint-for-teachers-K-3

Climate Change for Children K-3 Free Presentation

This post has a climate change for children K-3 free discussion PDF because such resources are few and far between. I hope it will help teachers who will find the free download at the next link. It is a PDF for use with small or large groups.

what-causes-rain-bombs-and-flooding-k-3-free-presentation PDF

When we talk about the ozone layer in the sky, it is surely confusing to children who look way up and feel like the sky goes on and on forever. Especially to them, the distance must seem great and there is no obvious line in the sky.

Climate Change for Children K-3 Free Presentation

I thought such a discussion might begin with talking about the water cycle. Probably the class has done an experiment to show condensation. For sure children have noticed rainy days cause puddles to form.

Climate Change for Children K-3 Free Presentation

From this discussion, it could be pointed out that icebergs and glaciers are melting. Children might be aware if their parents watch the news or they have heard some other way. Hasn’t it seemed that climate change used to make the news every year or so, while this summer it is making a daily appearance? The actual explanation is more complicated as this article suggests. Land icebergs reflect sunlight, but when land icebergs melt the water is blue and doesn’t reflect, which means it absorbs heat from the sun. Children do not need to understand the finer details, though.

Climate Change for Children K-3 Free Presentation

It helps to show an image of possible sources of too much carbon dioxide, as well. The children can probably tell about when they saw a factory with smoke coming out of smokestacks. They have probably noticed some other such things, as well.

explaining-climate-change-to-children-K-3 (11)

It is important that the children do not feel they are at fault. Of course, they are not the people who did such things.

explaining-climate-change-to-children-K-3 (25)

They might be reassured to know animals also did not cause pollution.

explaining-climate-change-to-children-K-3 (26)

Of course, it is important to tell children how they might help the Earth. They have probably been told things like turn off lights when you leave a room, recycle, and so on. But now they might feel these things are especially important.

explaining-climate-change-to-children-K-3 (28)

We have friends who have scuba dived all over the world. They stopped about ten years ago after 25 years of such travel. They mentioned how much ocean life had deteriorated over that time period due to pollution. We are all being made aware of plastic trash in the ocean and what a problem it is to animals. The chemicals from the plastics harm ocean plants as well, and will for decades to come.

Now storms are different each time. We have worse storms, rain bombs, land cyclones, and so on. It seems we often have a hundred-year storm happening somewhere. If you listen to the news or read the newspaper, the amount of news about climate change has become overwhelming.

This PowerPoint is basically about recycling, and it shows what some grown-ups are doing to help. It has 35 slides. Another really important lesson for children is about reducing what we use. Stay tuned for more educational resources about reducing and reusing.  So often, lessons end at recycling, and there we are done. Not so! I hope this helps children understand why recycling is important and that teachers will find the download helpful.

Thank you for reading, Carolyn

I took the Climate Reality Leadership Corps Training in Minneapolis, MN, in August 2019

climate-reality-leadership-corps-training-august-Minneapolis-Convention-Center-2019

Go to Top